NDT and art.

This is a short intermezzo blog, as always people seem to find a bridge in between technology and art. Well actually, to be honest, it’s not hard to imagine X-ray NDT technology being used for art, as it is just a special kind of photography after all.

The following TED talks is a video about Nick Veasey, who has devoted his life to creating awesome X-ray pictures of interesting situations and objects.

What surprised me is the amount of work that goes into creating these pictures. For instance, i wasn’t aware that for an X-ray of a ‘mini’ you’d have to disassemble the entire car and take pictures of every individual component ,only to reassemble the whole later…  I also feel slightly cheated about the fact that most of the ‘people’ you see are actually just skeletons.

Nevertheless, awesome stuff to look at. If you had access to his installation for a day, what would you scan?

I figure i’d scan a magic 8-ball, always wondered what goes on in there.

magic-8-ball-shirt

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3 thoughts on “NDT and art.

  1. I think a xray of a watch would be pretty nice. But I think it would take a long time to make the pictures of all the different components and to reassemble them.

    Do you know if they can also make video in xray? I don’t know how much time it takes to take one xray picture, but if they can make multiple pictures per second you can make amazing things. You could give a whole new dimension on crashtests for example. It could be very interesting if you can see the inside of the parts or the influence on the human skeleton during the collision.

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  2. In theory it would be possible to make X-ray videos!

    Due to the hazardous nature of X-rays it’s potential is rather limited tough… Time wise X-ray photography isn’t that different from normal photography, creating one frame only requires a fraction of a second. However, the more detail you want, the longer your exposure time has to be…

    The thing is that opposite to your ‘camera’ you’d always need an X-ray source. And for a full frame picture you’d already need a rather large installation that requires a lot of power.

    This immediately makes it difficult to have a moving camera that can pan / tilt / shift / rotate / whatever, as the heavy source installation would always have to remain opposite to the camera. I figure a mechanical construction to achieve this isn’t impossible but would cause enormous restrictions in what you could do. Also, you can’t ever have humans nearby your shoot…

    Most of the video’s you’ll find on line are of medical nature, with a locked plane of view…

    A couple of posts ago i discussed MRI, this technology is harmless and does allow you to make videos, in this post I embedded an MRI video which might satisfy your request..

    I like your crash-test concept ! Very interesting idea, if they don’t already apply it, they should ! I’m guessing that filming this is possible, the bus in the TED video was photographed with a large X-ray machine so modifying this might enable your idea

    I’m not sure about any other limitations tough, like i said, getting a detailed picture does require longer exposure time so I’m not sure you’d actually get some useful information out of the video.

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  3. The crashtest idea seems like a great one. Definitely one they should consider using in the industry to learn more about what really happens during the accident.

    I think I would like to know what’s inside a person’s stomach after eating a Mc Donalds hamburger. Numerous videos have been posted online on what they look like after a few months, but we haven’t seen any from inside a person’s stomach (maybe the burger stays in there for langer than we know).

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